Now that warmer weather is just-around-the-corner, you’re probably ready to tackle the age-old ritual of springtime house cleaning.  Then head-out your backdoor to spruce-up your outdoor spaces as well… both landscaping and hardscaping.

Composite Deck with Planters by Archadeck

Composite Deck with Planters by Archadeck

When it comes to spring landscaping, most folks will rake, seed, trim, prune and plant.  For fabulous gardening advice, yard tools and more, visit reputable sites such as P. Allen Smith, ProPlugger, or the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

Regarding ‘hardscapes’  or outdoor structures, winter can leave things covered in gunk.  So if you have a deck, porch or patio — let the sweeping, washing, and (maybe) sealing or staining begin!*

Choose the appropriate cleaner for your outdoor space because wood, composite and vinyl have different maintenance requirements.  To prevent material damage, follow the care instructions, to-the-T.*

But to instantly brighten your outdoor space after a brutal winter, use plants.  And here are five ways to incorporate foliage, beyond your garden beds, to your deck this spring. 

Vinyl Gazebo on Ipe Deck by Archadeck

Vinyl Gazebo on Ipe Deck by Archadeck

Hanging plants

For an immediate deck garden, go with hanging plants.  Buy the plant, tack-it-up and you’re done!

No digging in the dirt or waiting for growth.  You’ll hit the jackpot with on-the-spot color. Nothing could be simpler.

Container gardening on your deck

Begin with the best type of plant for the space and sun.  Then pick an appropriate container that reflects your style.

Short on room?  Go vertical.  Lots of room?  Think about clustering containers in more than one plant-zone.

Flowers?  Vegetables?  Herbs?  Take your pick or mix-it-up.

Just make sure watering is convenient and drainage is adequate to avoid deck damage.

Roof Deck with Containers of Flowers, Plants, Tomatoes, Project by Archadeck

Roof Deck by Archadeck, Containers of Flowers, Plants, and Tomatoes

Detachable planters for deck rails

Deck rail planters will transform your deck into a hardscape garden.  Advantages of these planters include price and privacy, convenience and curb appeal, versatility and variety.

  • From big box stores to specialty retailers, attaching a flower box or planter to the top of your deck’s rail is doable.  For as little as $10 or $15 you can make it happen.
  • Depending on the height of the banister and your plants, rail boxes filled with foliage create privacy.
  • The elevation of rail planters makes watering easy.  No bending necessary.
  • Since a deck is often visible to neighbors, a color-filled railing adds curb appeal.
  • Available in a wide variety of materials, planters come in wood, wicker or wrought iron as well as plastics, vinyl and many metals too.
  • Then switch-out the flowers or other garden growth from time-to-time for instant seasonal decor.
Deck with Rail Planters, Project by Archadeck

Deck with Rail Planters, Project by Archadeck

Built-in planters for deck rails

Did you know that your builder can include planters within your deck design?

Oh yes they can and there are several options to consider.  Take a look!

  • Planters right on top of the rails.
  • Planters to complement or to supplement the deck rails.
  • Or planters that completely replace deck rails.
Built In Planter Boxes Atop Deck Rail, Project by Archadeck

Built In Planter Boxes Atop Deck Rail, Project by Archadeck

Deck with Large Built-in Planter by Archadeck

Deck with Large Built-in Planter In Addition To Rails, Project by Archadeck

Deck with Built In Planters, by Archadeck

Deck with Built In Planters, by Archadeck

Built-in planters for deck steps

Just like the deck rails, built-in planters can be designed in-and-around steps too.

Here, take another look.

Composite Deck with Built In Planters by Archadeck

Composite Deck with Built In Planters by Archadeck

Built In Planters for Deck by Archadeck

Built In Planters for Deck by Archadeck

Key takeaways

  • It’s springtime and officially ‘clean-up season’ – both inside and out.
  • First of all, inspect your deck or other outdoor space for safety.  Then clean, maintain or repair it accordingly.
  • Add individual plants or a full-blown container garden to your deck for sensational, seasonal color.
  • Soften the edges of an outdoor structure with detachable or built-in planters to harmonize the space with your landscape.
  • For an integrative deck design, consider built-in planters that blend with either your deck rails, steps or both.
  • Spring is almost here, so get out the grill and start living outdoors!

Next Steps?

To discover and explore more ideas about decks and other outdoor spaces, just visit our website, west-county.archadeck.com.   You’ll have access to photo galleries, an online inquiry form, videos and a free download for Archadeck’s design guide. 

Archadeck's Free Design Guide - Cover Graphic by Matthew Victor, St. Louis Mo

Archadeck’s Free Design Guide – Cover Graphic by Matthew Victor, St. Louis Mo

If you live in or near St. Louis Missouri and want to speak with a contractor, please consider Archadeck.  Our offices are convenient and in St. Louis West County.  Best of all, we’re locally owned and operated.  We live here, work here and we know St. Louis!

(Archadeck of West County and St. Charles County serves the Greater St. Louis territory including all areas of St. Louis County, St. Charles, St. Charles County and parts of Illinois too.)

We’d love to answer your questions and meet with you anytime, 636.227.0800

Are you living outside of St. Louis?  Then just go to archadeck.com to find the nearest Archadeck to your hometown or call 888-687-3325.

Sources

This Old House, Albaugh & Sons Fencing, Dwell, The Budget Dumpster, Sunset, Tropical Plants and Flower Guide, Beautiful Backyard Blog, Archadeck Outdoor Living, Archadecks in Chester County PA,  Front Range CO, Charlotte NC, Central Maryland, West Central Ohio, Nova Scotia, Columbus OH

Design Guide Cover by Matthew Victor, Intern for Archadeck of West County. Contact Matt by email at mtvictor00@gmail.com.  Matt has earned a Bachelor’s degree in Information Systems from the University of Missouri–St. Louis and is currently completing a second degree in graphic design.